NCAR to showcase high-end technologies that enable scientific discovery

By Staff
12/02/2008 - 12:00am

A series of presentations by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists will describe current research results on topics such as global climate change, forecasting hurricane intensity and position, and astrophysical turbulence. The central theme will be how large-scale simulation efforts and emerging technologies and new tools are improving our ability to understand our planet. All presenters will be available for questions and answers.

NCAR is a founding member of the SC conference organization, and has been an exhibitor at the annual conference since 1989.NCAR’s Computational and Information Systems Laboratory (CISL) hosts NCAR’s exhibit at SC08 and will showcase how NCAR uses high-end technologies to advance scientific discovery. The NCAR exhibit will highlight how CISL supports large, accelerated scientific discovery (ASD) projects while delivering world-class capacity computing to significant numbers of smaller scientific projects.

CISL staff will also give presentations describing recent advances in NCAR’s cyberinfrastructure environment. These include TeraGrid collaborations, the development of petascale applications, and software infrastructure such as the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF).

NCAR is a research and development center sponsored by the National Science Foundation dedicated to exploring and understanding the atmosphere and its interactions with the Sun, the oceans, the biosphere, and human society. CISL supports the geosciences community with supercomputing and cyberinfrastructure services, it conducts research on information technology and computational science, and it develops applied mathematics for geosciences computation.

Booth #365 Hosted by:
Computational & Information Systems Laboratory (CISL)
National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)
Boulder, Colorado

 

  • Tuesday, November 18
    • 10:30 am - 11:15 am
      • David Lawrence, Accelerating Change in the Arctic?
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    • 11:30 am – 12:15 pm
      • James Hurrell, Prediction Across Scales: the Nested Regional Climate Model Approach
        »more
    • 1:30 pm – 2:15 pm
      • James Done, Hurricane Modeling using the Advanced Hurricane-research WRF Model
        »more
    • 2:30 pm – 3:15 pm
      • Matthew Woitaszek, Asteroseismic Modeling Portal
    • 3:30 pm – 4:15 pm
      • Richard Loft, An Inconvenient Question: Are We Going to Get the Algorithms and Computing Technology We Need to Make Critical Climate Predictions in Time?
        »more
  • Wednesday, November 19
    • 10:30 am - 11:15 am
      • David Lawrence, Accelerating Change in the Arctic?
        »more
    • 11:30 am – 12:15 pm
      • James Hurrell, Prediction Across Scales: the Nested Regional Climate Model Approach
        »more
    • 1:30 pm – 2:15 pm
      • James Done, Hurricane Modeling using the Advanced Hurricane-research WRF Model
        »more
    • 2:30 pm – 3:15 pm
      • Matthew Woitaszek, Asteroseismic Modeling Portal
    • 3:30 pm – 4:15 pm
      • Richard Loft, An Inconvenient Question: Are We Going to Get the Algorithms and Computing Technology We Need to Make Critical Climate Predictions in Time?
        »more
  • Thursday, November 20
    • 10:30 am - 11:15 am
      • Sylvia Murphy, Community Analysis and Visualization Tools for the Geosciences
        »more
    • 11:30 am – 12:15 pm
      • Sylvia Murphy, ESMF and the Future of End-to-End Modeling
        »more