CISL Seminar - Video Compression of Ocean Simulation Databases: A Case Study in Automating Image-based Perceptual Experiments

06/07/2017 - 10:00am to 11:00am
ML - Main Seminar Room

Video Compression of Ocean Simulation Databases: A Case Study in Automating Image-based Perceptual Experiments

Terry Turton

University of Texas at Austin

Climate research requires monitoring a large range of spatial and temporal scales to understand the climate system and potential future impacts. Climate simulations are now run with very high resolution (1–10 km gridcells) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere components and can easily produce petabytes of output.  Image databases can decrease storage sizes from petabytes of simulation output down to several hundred gigabytes of images.  Video compression can be used to further decrease database sizes by several orders of magnitude.  Post-compression image quality can be assessed through common quality metrics.  Additionally, a crowdsourced perceptual assessment of the visual image quality is compared to expert feedback.   The perceptual assessment leverages the Evaluation Toolkit (ETK), a repository of open-source JavaScript modules designed to automate image-based perceptual evaluations.   Other approaches to the assessment of compressed climate data visualizations utilizing ETK modules will be discussed. 

Biography

Dr. Terece Turton received her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan with an early career in high energy physics.  Now a researcher in the Center for Agile Technology at the University of Texas at Austin, her current research area is user evaluation for scientific visualization.  With color playing such a vital role in scientific visualizations, Dr. Turton has teamed with the Data Science at Scale team at Los Alamos National Lab together with a visual artist specializing in color to develop and validate improved colormapping approaches, allowing greater perceptual depth into scientific visualizations.  In order to facilitate user studies by other visualization researchers, Dr. Turton has developed a suite of open-source modules that embody a range of psychophysical approaches to perceptual evaluation, the Evaluation Toolkit. 

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room